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Breaking down barriers This report was prepared following a meeting convened by the International Harm Reduction Development Programme (IHRD) of the Open Society Institute in March 2004, to discuss strategies for expanding access to HIV treatment, care and support for injection drug users. The report was launched at the satellite meeting "HIV treatment for Drug Users-A Realistic Goal", co-sponsored by IHRD and held during the Bangkok International AIDS Conference in July 2004.
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Compendium of key documents relating to human rights and HIV in Eastern and Southern Africa Compendium of key documents relating to human rights and HIV in Eastern and Southern Africa
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Policy Framework for Population Mobility and Communicable Diseases in the SADC Region The SADC policy framework for population mobility and communicable diseases in southern Africa. "Population mobility has also been recognized as a factor in the spread of communicable diseases, which in turn led to the recognition of the need for cross-border collaborations....This Framework acknowledges that one of the risks mobile people encounter is communicable diseases. It has therefore been framed to form a basis for programming for mobile populations and communicable diseases in the SADC region."
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SADC Code on HIV / AIDS and Employment Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV) infection and the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in the countries of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) (and globally) is a major health problem with employment, economic and human rights implications. As one response to this problem the SADC Employment and Labour Sector has established this code on the industrial relations standards on HIV / AIDS, the "Code on AIDS and Employment"
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Criminal Law, Public Health and HIV Transmission: Policy Options Paper A very good paper published by UNAIDS outlining the policy options in respect of wilful transmission of HIV. Essential reading for those grappling with whether or not criminalisation of wilful transmission is at all desirable or useful as a tool to reduce HIV transmission.
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Measuring Up Facilitators guide
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Leadership Report 2011 30 July
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Moving from rhetoric to action with key populations in africa The International HIV/ AIDS Alliance (IHAA) and the AIDS and Rights Alliance for Southern Africa (ARASA) co-hosted a Round Table Event on Moving from Rhetoric to Action with Key Populations
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Malawi HIV/AIDS, TB and Human Rights country Programme Best Practices The Centre for Human Rights and Rehabilitation and Centre for Development of People hosted and coordinated a Malawi National HIV, TB and Human Rights Advocacy and Capacity building program implemented under a consortium of five institutions. They are; Centre for the Development of People (CEDEP), Centre for Human Rights and Rehabilitation (CHRR), Coalition of Women and Girls Living with HIV/AIDS (COWHLA), Ladder for Rural Development and Grassroots Movement for Health and Development. The programme was started from 2012 to 2014 with sponsorship and technical support from the AIDS and Rights Alliance for Southern Africa (ARASA), with the goal of ensuring improved human rights by advocating for the review and reform of discriminatory laws and policies, which increase vulnerability of PLHIV and Sexual Minorities by promoting equal access to health services in Malawi. The programme was run through the National Programme Coordinators reporting to ARASA through CEDEP and CHRR.
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Articulating a Rights based approach NTRODUCTION In 2001, United Nations (UN) member states agreed to goals that would provide HIV care, treatment and prevention services to all who need them [1]. The World Health Organization (WHO) 3 x 5 initiative operationalised this goal which was reaffirmed by the June 2006 Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS [3], and unanimously adopted by the UN member states. At the same time, the Political Declaration recognized that combating HIV/AIDS is a pre- condition to achieving many of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) [4]. To complement these political commitments, funding mechanisms, such as the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) and the United States (US) President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) were created. Much has been accomplished: since that first agreement in 2001, more than five million people have gained access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), AIDS deaths and hospitali- zations have decreased, and rates of new infections have been reduced in many countries [5]. In June 2011, the UN General Assembly (UNGA) reaffirmed its goals to address AIDS, setting ambitious targets for 2015 including the elimination of vertical HIV transmission, a 50% reduction in sexually-transmitted HIV infections and 15 million people on ART.
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The Criminalisation of HIV Abstract Throughout the HIV epidemic, criminal law has been invoked to deter and punish sexual transmission. The public health community has not favored the enactment of criminal laws specifically targeting people with HIV, nor endorsed the application of general criminal laws to HIV – but neither has it taken a vigorous stand against them. Meanwhile, governments continue to adopt HIV-specific criminal laws, and individuals with HIV continue to be prosecuted under general criminal law around the world. This comment argues that criminal law cannot draw reasonable, enforceable lines between criminal and non-criminal behavior, nor protect individuals or society from HIV transmission. In the protection of women, it is a poor substitute for policies that go to the roots of subordination and gender-based violence. The use of criminal law to address HIV is inappropriate except in rare cases where a person acts with conscious intent to transmit HIV and does so.
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A presentation on the legislative framework for HIV/AIDS and Human Rights in Swaziland by Margaret Zulu from WLSA A presentation on the legislative framework for HIV/AIDS and Human Rights in Swaziland by Margaret Zulu from WLSA.
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HIV/AIDS and Human Rights in Tanzania A guide to HIV/AIDS and Human Rights in Tanzania developed by SAHRINGON Tanzania Chapter with support from ARASA.
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Draft Code on HIV/AIDS and Gender ARASA and its partners have engaged in the development of a draft Code on HIV/AIDS and Gender, which has been translated into Portuguese and widely distributed in the region. Attempts on the part of ARASA to lobby SADC for the adoption of this document as a SADC Code proved unsuccessful. More recently however discussions have commenced to see how the content of this document can be incorporated in the upcoming SADC Protocol on Gender Equality.
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Stop AIDS factsheet sex work Whilst the links between sex work and HIV have been made since the earliest days of the epidemic, these have often generated stigma by reinforcing crude stereotypes of sex workers as ‘vectors of disease’. More recent acknowledgements of sex workers as a ‘key population’ recognises the higher prevalence of HIV amongst sex workers around the world as a key barrier in the global fight to end the epidemic, and has firmly placed sex workers as vital partners in this fight. Lead agencies such as the Global Commission on HIV and the Law2 , UNAIDS3 , and the World Health Organization (WHO)4 now firmly recognise that sex workers are not the problem, but part of the solution.
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Alliance GPG-HIV and human rights This guide is a practical tool for HIV programmers to help you to respond to human rights within your HIV and broader health programmes. Published in partnership with the AIDS and Rights Alliance for Southern Africa (ARASA), the guide brings together international guidance, expertise from the Alliance global community, as well as ARASA’s experience of strengthening the capacity of its partners and the communities they serve. The Guide provides a clear rationale for the integration of human rights in HIV programmes, presenting the principles and elements of rights-based HIV programming. It also describes the integration of human rights principles and responses into the project cycle, from assessments to monitoring and evaluation. There are clear descriptions and practical examples of priority HIV and human rights programmes recommended by the Alliance and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). This guide is intended for use by CBOs, other civil society organisations (CSOs), key population networks and additional groups that work in HIV or other areas of health and who take a human rights-based approach to their programming. It is useful for organisations that are just starting to work in human rights as well as those with more experience.
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TB Landscape Analysis - As of 31 May To achieve universal access to TB services, and reduce TB incidence faster, more investment is essential. In 2015, the budget gap is estimated at about US$ 2 billion. BRICS countries in particular are already mobilizing considerable domestic resources, and could do more. International donor funding should focus on countries with high burdens relative to their resources, including some middle-income countries with high burdens of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB).
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HIV and Human rights good practise guide The HIV and Human Rights Good Practise Guide is an accessible and user-friendly guide to explain: what human-rights based HIV programming is, why it is important and the different ways that organisations can integrate human rights into their HIV programmes.
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Alliance GPG-HIV and human rights French
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HIVAIDS_and_Human_Rights_International_Guidelines In 1998 the OHCR and UNAIDS issued International Guidelines on HIV/AIDS and Human Rights. These guidelines built on expert advice to integrate the principles and standards of international human rights law into the HIV/AIDS response. The revision of Guideline 6 of the guidelines updates them to reflect new standards in HIV treatment and evolving international law on the right to health.
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10 Reasons Why Criminalisation Harms Women Responding to current trends towards criminalising HIV transmission and exposure, human rights and AIDS activists are raising concerns about the implications of these laws, especially for women’s risks and vulnerabilities. Calling for rights-based approaches in the response to HIV and AIDS, the publication ‘10 reasons why criminalisation of HIV exposure or transmission harms women’ clearly illustrates how criminalising HIV exposure or transmission – far from providing justice for women – endangers and further oppresses women. This document, endorsed by 21 organisations from around the world, affirms the protection and advancement of women’s rights as key for effective HIV and AIDS responses, and opposes laws that criminalise HIV exposure or transmission.
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Advocates Guide to the International Guidelines on HIV/AIDS and Human Rights A useful guide to using the International Guidelines on HIV/AIDS and Human Rights as a tool for advocacy.
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10 Reasons to oppose criminalisation of HIV exposure or transmission The push to apply criminal law to HIV exposure and transmission is often driven by the wish to respond to serious concerns about the ongoing rapid spread of HIV in many countries, coupled by what is perceived to be a failure of existing HIV prevention efforts. These concerns are legitimate.
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Directrizes Internacionais sobre HIV/SIDA e Direitos Humanos.
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